John C. Martin

Born: December 31, 1969

John C. Martin begins the interview by describing Gilead when he first joined in 1990. Martin recalls his first meeting with Gordon E. Moore, who joined the board around the same period as Martin. Martin then reflectes on serving on the Gilead board with Donald Rumsfeld and Moore, and also explains how Moore's experiences at Intel helped shaped polices of the compensation committee and audit committee on which he served. Lastly Martin speaks about Gilead's no-profit tiered pricing policy and the impact it has on developing countries, as well as final thoughts on Moore. 

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Interview Details

Interview no.: Oral History 0357
No. of pages: 16
Minutes: 43

Interview Sessions

David C. Brock
13 April 2007
By Telephone

Abstract of Interview

John C. Martin begins the interview by describing Gilead when he first joined in 1990. Martin recalls first crossing paths with Gordon E. Moore when he joined the board and became CEO of Gilead around the same time period as Moore joining the board. Martin then reflected on serving on the Gilead board with Donald Rumsfeld and Moore; Moore's experiences at Intel helped shaped polices of the compensation committee and audit committee on which he served. Next Martin discussed Gilead's no-profit tiered pricing policy and the impact it has on developing countries. Martin concludes the interview by offering thoughts on Moore's corporate role as a scientist and his day-to-day personality. 

Table of Contents

Joining Gilead
1

Company composition. Research and Development Work. Early encounters with Gordon Moore. Moore's contributions on the compensation committee. Gordon Moore's reputation and influences on Gilead culture.

Growth of Gilead
6

Period of rapid growth and Moore's advice on management. Gilead's manufacturing and management practices. Tiered pricing structure. Effects on having no-profit prices.

Thoughts on Gordon Moore
13

Gordon Moore's lessons based on his experience at Intel. Moore's corporate role as a scientist. Moore's personality.

Index
16

About the Interviewer

David C. Brock

David C. Brock is a senior research fellow with the Center for Contemporary History and Policy at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. As a historian of science and technology, he specializes in the history of semiconductor science, technology, and industry; the history of instrumentation; and oral history. Brock has studied the philosophy, sociology, and history of science at Brown University, the University of Edinburgh, and Princeton University.

In the policy arena Brock recently published Patterning the World: The Rise of Chemically Amplified Photoresists, a white-paper case study for the Center’s Studies in Materials Innovation. With Hyungsub Choi he is preparing an analysis of semiconductor technology roadmapping, having presented preliminary results at the 2009 meeting of the Industry Studies Association.