Douglas R. Kellogg

Born: 1960 | St. Paul, MN, US

Douglas R. Kellogg grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, the second oldest of four children. He had an early interest in reading, and took classes with several influential teachers. Kellogg first chose the University of Minnesota for his undergraduate studies, but after a summer job in Alaska, he transferred to University of Wisconsin, Madison. He always had an interest in and affinity for biology; between undergraduate and graduate school, Kellogg worked as a lab technician on Drosophila genetics, influencing the path of his future research interests and studies. There was no doubt in his mind that he would become a biologist. Kellogg chose to attend the University of California, San Francisco to pursue his graduate degree, working in Bruce M. Alberts's laboratory studying pattern formation in Drosophila embryo cytoskeleton. After completing his doctoral degree, he decided to stay in San Francisco for a postdoctoral position with Andrew W. Murray and researched the role of mitotic cyclin in coordination of cell growth and cell division. After his postdoc, Kellogg took a position at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where his research has focused on cell-signaling biochemistry in the coordination, division, and regulation of cell growth. In the interview, he spoke at length about the makeup of his lab and how he manages and teaches in the lab. Kellogg also reflects upon the role of technology, critical inquiry, competition, collaborationand creativity in his research and in his science in general. The interview concludes with a discussion of the role of the scientist in educating the public about science, and how this factors in to setting his own and the national scientific agenda; he also offers advice for beginning scientists, and reflects on his favorite scientific papers.

Access This Interview

The information listed below is current as of the date the transcript was finalized.

			

Interview Details

Interview no.: Oral History 0518
No. of pages: 98
Minutes: 300

Interview Sessions

William Van Benschoten
13 and 17 January 2005
University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California

Abstract of Interview

Douglas R. Kellogg grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, the second oldest of four children. He had an early interest in reading, and took classes with several influential teachers. Kellogg first chose the University of Minnesota for his undergraduate studies, but after a summer job in Alaska, he transferred to University of Wisconsin, Madison. He always had an interest in and affinity for biology; between undergraduate and graduate school, Kellogg worked as a lab technician on Drosophila genetics, influencing the path of his future research interests and studies. There was no doubt in his mind that he would become a biologist. Kellogg chose to attend the University of California, San Francisco to pursue his graduate degree, working in Bruce M. Alberts's laboratory studying pattern formation in Drosophila embryo cytoskeleton. After completing his doctoral degree, he decided to stay in San Francisco for a postdoctoral position with Andrew W. Murray and researched the role of mitotic cyclin in coordination of cell growth and cell division. After his postdoc, Kellogg took a position at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where his research has focused on cell-signaling biochemistry in the coordination, division, and regulation of cell growth. In the interview, he spoke at length about the makeup of his lab and how he manages and teaches in the lab. Kellogg also reflects upon the role of technology, critical inquiry, competition, collaboration and creativity in his research and in his science in general. The interview concludes with a discussion of the role of the scientist in educating the public about science, and how this factors in to setting his own and the national scientific agenda; he also offers advice for beginning scientists, and reflects on his favorite scientific papers.

Education

Year Institution Degree Discipline
1982 University of Wisconsin, Madison BS Biochemistry
1991 University of California, San Francisco PhD Cell Biology

Professional Experience

University of California, San Francisco

1991 to 1994
Postdoctoral Fellow, Laboratory of Dr. Andrew Murray

University of California, Santa Cruz

1995 to 2000
Assistant Professor
2000
Associate Professor

Honors

Year(s) Award
1981 to 1982

Knapp Fellowship for Undergraduate Research

1991

Larry Sandler Memorial Lecture/Outstanding Graduate Thesis, Drosophila Research Conference

1991 to 1994

Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

1996 to 1999

American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Research Award

1998 to 2000

University of California Biotechnology Training Program (Grant shared between four labs.)

1998 to 2002

Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences

Table of Contents

Childhood and High School
1

Growing up in St. Paul, Minnesota. Family background. Parents. Siblings. Childhood interests and experiences. Early schooling. Influential teachers. Interest in reading. Attending high school. Qualities of a good teacher.

College and Graduate School
22

Religion. Attends the University of Minnesota. Transfers to the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Extracurricular activities in high school. College experiences. Attends graduate school at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Graduate program at UCSF. Defining moment in a lecture by Marc W. Kirschner. Works in developmental cell biology in Bruce M. Alberts's laboratory studying pattern formation in the Drosophila embryo cytoskeleton.

Postdoctoral Work and Becoming Faculty
41

Postdoctoral fellowship with Andrew W. Murray at University of California, San Francisco. Murray's laboratory management style. Postdoctoral research on the role of mitotic cyclin in coordination of cell growth and cell division. Accepts a position at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). Setting up his laboratory. Funding history. Grant-writing process. Writing journal articles. Research in cell-signaling biochemistry in coordination of cell growth and division and the regulation of cell growth. Future research in cell signaling. Tenure at UCSC. Teaching responsibilities. Administrative duties. Laboratory management style. Leisure activities. Pew Scholars Program in the BiomedicalSciences.

Science and Scientific Practice
73

Competition and collaboration in science. Patents. Interest in the history of science. National scientific agenda. Role of the scientist in educating the public about science. Privatization of scientific research. Gender. Bringing underrepresented groups into science. Advice for beginning scientists. Favorite scientific papers.

Index
96

About the Interviewer

William Van Benschoten